The use of irony in chaucers

Cover of Spanish translation of Chaucer,

The use of irony in chaucers

Humour in the Prologue appears chiefly in the shape of irony and satire, though we do have some examples of pure humour which means fun and laughter for their own sake. Chaucer is perpetually showing the humorous side, not merely of his emotions but his interests, his knowledge, his beliefs, his everything.

His characterization of almost all the characters is, indeed humorous.

The use of irony in chaucers

Irony is one of the chief weapons of Satire. Chaucer is not out to reform people but he surely finds amusement in the absurdities, affections, and some of the minor vices of the people he deals with. His humour is thoroughly delightful, being free from the taint of ill-will, cynicism, and pessimism.

His whole point of view in dealing with human life and human beings is that of a humorist. The poet paints the character of the Clerk of Oxford with kind and patronizing humour. His humour is all pervading and pervasive.

Its omnipresence holds a perennial charm to us. But it is not without pathos. He mingles the comic with the tragic. Smiles and tears find here equal. Besides, humour in Chaucer never forced upon the reader.

It arises out the situation. No effort is exercised by the author to create humour. It is spontaneous, natural, and inevitable. The Prioress speaks French fluently.

Her dress and her fashionable manners are also ironically described. Her charitable nature is depicted in such a way as to amuse us. The Monk too is portrayed satirically. He is fond of hunting; he keeps a large number of fine horses in his stable; he finds the rules of monastic discipline to be old and therefore out of date; he does not wish to drive himself made by studying too much; and so on.

The worldliness of this Monk is clearly exposed by ironic means.

How does Chaucer use irony in the Canterbury Tales? | eNotes

Irony is employed in the portrait of the Friar, too. Here are the most ironical lines: This humour lends a most distinctive quality to his character-sketches.Chaucer's Wife of Bath.

Perhaps the best-known pilgrim in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales is Alisoun, the Wife of Bath. The Wife's fame derives from Chaucer's deft characterization of her as a brassy, bawdy woman—the very antithesis of virtuous womanhood—who .

There are numerous examples of dramatic irony in The Canterbury Tales.

The Rich Diversity of Meanings of the Pardoner's Tale - The Rich Diversity of Meanings of the Pardoner's Tale Chaucer’s innovation in the Pardoner’s performance tests our concept of dramatic irony by suggesting information regarding the Pardoner’s sexuality, gender identity, and spirituality, major categories in the politics of identity, without confirming that information. EDUC Outdoor Environmental Education in Theory, Policy and Practice: Days: MWF Time: pm pm Room: ARTCOM Instructor: Dosch, Kurth-Schai Avail./Max.: 7 / 16 *One of our primary course objectives is to offer quality outdoor environmental learning experiences for . Chaucer's Wife of Bath. Perhaps the best-known pilgrim in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales is Alisoun, the Wife of Bath. The Wife's fame derives from Chaucer's deft characterization of her as a brassy, bawdy woman—the very antithesis of virtuous womanhood—who .

Overall, Chaucer skillfully uses irony as a way of putting distance between what appears on the surface to be the case and what he thinks is really going on. Thirdly, Chaucer’s irony is clear as can be the point at which he comments that the Lawyer was the busiest man in England.

Chaucer’s comments about the Doctor of Physic are just as humorous. Chaucer’s comments about . The medieval word for a Poet was a Maker, which indeed is the original meaning of a Poet. It is one of the points, more numerous than some suppose, in which Greek and medieval simplicity nearly touch.

The use of irony in chaucers

EDUC Outdoor Environmental Education in Theory, Policy and Practice: Days: MWF Time: pm pm Room: ARTCOM Instructor: Dosch, Kurth-Schai Avail./Max.: 7 / 16 *One of our primary course objectives is to offer quality outdoor environmental learning experiences for .

Thirdly, Chaucer's irony is crystal clear when he remarks that the Lawyer was the busiest man in England. Chaucer's remarks about the Doctor of Physic are equally ironical.

The use of the world “Worthy” for the most unworthy characters brings a tickling irony except for the “Worthy” Knight.

Comment on Chaucer's use of irony in the Prologue to the Canterbury Tales? | eNotes